Prospecting U.S.A. Hunting America's Treasure's

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Pic's

Posted by wendell mosley on May 10, 2010 at 11:27 AM Comments comments (0)

It would be nice if all members would post a pic of them self on there profile so we can see you not cridders or simbles thanks Wendell

club stuff

Posted by wendell mosley on April 27, 2010 at 11:47 AM Comments comments (0)

Go to links page and come to our store we have hat's t shirt's mug's and stickers

testing

Posted by wendell mosley on April 12, 2010 at 11:03 AM Comments comments (5)

I got to go by the place in Duck  Town Ga. and do some test panning, I got about a 1/4 of a bucket of dirt from the dry creek bed and all I found was one little piece of wire gold about 2 mm long. I had to go throught some blackberry  bushes and underbrush the ditch is about 4 to 6 foot deep. So I am not shure if it would be worth doing a club outing there what do you think. I also went to Arbcoochie stoped be side the road on a creek looking around I found a small gold pan and I scooped two pans of sand found a good bit of flower gold nothing bigger in that spot but it was just on top could be bigger deeped down or up stream. But I did get a free pan so I did'nt waist my time stopping.

wendell

Meeting Time

Posted by wendell mosley on February 20, 2010 at 9:53 PM Comments comments (3)

I am trying to set a meeting time I think 8 Pm central time on sat shoud be a good time that is 9 pm eastern time if any one thinks that is not a good time tell me when would be.

Wendell

Kelly co.

Posted by wendell mosley on February 20, 2010 at 9:48 PM Comments comments (1)

We have a sponcer Kellycodetectos hope you will check them out .

They have us listed in there club's list I hope it help's us grow.

Comments on Alabama Gold

Posted by wendell mosley on Comments comments (0)
Comments on Mining of Gold, Gold Prospecting, Gold Panning, Treasure Hunting and Rockhounding in Alabama The gold prospecting and mining sites in Alabama start in Chilton County between Montgomery and Birmingham and continue to the east and northeast to the Alabama/Georgia state line. The gold panning, prospecting and mining sites then carry on into Georgia and thence on through the Carolinas to northern Virginia. Gold prospecting and panning sites will be seen in the Talladega National Forest, the boundaries of which are shown on the Alabama Gold Prospecting and Panning Map. Gold has also been found in Gold Branch, a creek in the northeast corner of Elmore county. Alabama Highway 229 crosses Gold Branch between Kent and Red Hill. Gold Branch flows into the Tallapoosa River about five miles downstream of the dam at Martin Lake. The deposit appears to be a continuation of the trend of gold mining sites shown along Martin Lake on the Alabama Gold Prospecting and Panning Map. Gold Panning Note: Gold historical information herein was obtained from research of geological records of the Alabama Geological Survey, the U. S. Bureau of Mines, the U.S. Geological Survey and similar documents as pertains to gold mines, gold prospecting and panning areas and mineral and gem stone occurrences in Alabama. Prior work by Thomas A. Simpson, Thornton L. Neathery and George I. Adams is acknowledged. Alabama geological documents state that it is generally agreed by historians that the Indians and Spanish explorers did not find gold in Alabama. There is no way to confirm the exact year of discovery of gold in Alabama; however, it is accepted to have been about 1830. After the gold discoveries in Georgia in 1828, gold prospectors expanded their search for gold into Alabama. Intruders prospected for gold on lands belonging to the Creek Indians, who held the area that included the gold deposits. A treaty was negotiated by the United States for the lands of the Creeks. The treaty was signed in 1832; but, before the removal of the Indians was accomplished, the state legislature formed the lands into counties and settlers flocked in. Further research of gold history as recorded in geological reports, reveals that about 1836 there was a great deal of excitement in the gold fields of Alabama. One of the early gold districts, Arbacoochee, is said to have given employment to 600 men and in 1845 had a contributory population of 5,000 inhabitants. Goldville, another Alabama gold district, was said to have had 14 stores and the population in the locality was at least 3,000. Goldville later became a cross-roads without a store. Most Alabama gold miners left the state to join the California Gold Rush in 1849. Gold prospecting and panning in Alabama revived when Cornish miners came from Tennessee in 1853-1854 to search for copper. There was another revival of gold mining in the 1880???s and cyaniding was introduced in Alabama in 1903. Some Alabama gold mines were in operation at various times up to 1916. Another spurt in panning and prospecting for gold took place during the depression when people were out of work and the price of gold was increased to $35 per ounce. Gold pans and sluice boxes were widely used to recover gold from stream placers. Gold mines and prospecting and panning sites continue on the adjoining Georgia Gold Prospecting and Panning Map. To request gold prospecting and panning maps, please go to "REQUESTING GOLD MAPS", below. RECREATIONAL GOLD PROSPECTING, GOLD PANNING, TREASURE HUNTING AND ROCKHOUNDING ARE FUN!

Georgia gold History

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Georgia Gold Mining History Portions of the following paragraphs about gold mines, gold prospecting and panning are from an article entitled "Georgia Gold" by Charles A. Overbey in Gems and Minerals magazine and is reprinted by permission of Gems and Minerals. Prior work by Robert G. Cook is acknowledged. Gold was discovered in North Carolina in 1799; then came discoveries in South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama and Virginia. The gold-bearing strip was traced by pioneers from the North Carolina Piedmont into the Cherokee Territory. But, not until 1828 or 1829 did the major gold boom start - when news spread that gold had been discovered in North Georgia on Cherokee land. A few months after the announcement of the discovery, hundreds of men were searching for the metal; and within a year, thousands of miners had descended into Georgia to seek the golden treasure. In 1830 a U.S. Army major described the motley appearance of the "whites, Indians, half-breeds and Negroes, boys of fourteen and old men of seventy" who sought their fortunes in the river beds and hillsides of Georgia. Dahlonega Gold Museum, Dahlonega, Georgia In 1837, the U.S. Government established a gold coin mint at Dahlonega, Georgia, about 60 miles north of Atlanta. Gold from Georgia mines and gold mines in surrounding states flowed to this mint. Private gold mints also turned out gold coins that were widely accepted in trade. Notable was the gold mint of Templeton Reid at Gainesville, Georgia. Gold coins from the Reid mint are now in great demand by collectors and command premium prices in the rare coin market, as do coins from the Dahlonega Gold Mint. Coins from the Dahlonega Gold Mint may be seen at the Dahlonega Gold Museum. Many Georgia gold miners went west in the great California Gold Rush. On a Saturday in 1849, a crowd gathered in front of the Lumpkin County courthouse to hear Matthew F. Stephenson, assayer of the Dahlonega mint. From the balcony of the courthouse he pointed to Findley Ridge in front of him and implored the miners to stay in Dahlonega, saying "There???s millions in it." Not deterred by his entreaty, the "Forty-Niners" left for California, but they carried his words with them. Mark Twain, hearing them from a friend, William Sellers, wrote in Gilded Age his famous version of Dr. Stephenson???s expression: "There???s gold in them thar hills." Green Russell, an Auraria, Georgia (Auraria is about 5 miles from Dahlonega) gold miner, returned from California and later, with his two brothers, led a gold party to the Kansas Territory, starting the "Pikes Peak or Bust" gold stampede that gave birth to Colorado. He helped found a small village in Colorado, naming it Auraria. It is today a part of the City of Denver. SOME IMPORTANT GEORGIA GOLD FINDS Gold has been reported from virtually every county in Georgia that is underlain by "chrystalline" rocks. Commercial mining was done by hydraulics, dredging and by conventional lode mining means. Individual small mining operations were carried on by panning and by use of sluice boxes. Georgia Geologic Survey Bulletin 92, by Robert G. Cook, lists nuggets of 54, 40, and 35 troy ounces from Gilmer County; 42 and 11 ounces from Habersham County; 26, 25, 19, 18, 15, 5, 4, 3 and 2 ounces from White County; 15, 6, and 4 ounces from Lumpkin County and 4, and 3 ounces from Cherokee County. A number of interesting finds of crystalline, wire and leaf gold are also mentioned, some of which were gleaned from earlier geological documents by Yeates, McCallie and King (1896) and Jones (1909). A few of these are: The Potosi Gold Mine, in Hall County about 11 miles northwest of Gainesville, was the source of numerous very fine examples of crystalline gold. One superb example from this location is preserved in the museum of the Georgia State Capitol. Samples taken from the Wellborn Gold Mine in Union County contained beautifully clean, bright gold in distinct crystals and in leaf-like aggregates. An assay of this ore indicated that it contained 4.47 ounces of gold per ton. The Loud Mine in White County produced magnificent specimens of crystallized and wire gold that were exhibited in this country and abroad. Jones (1909) mentions a discovery of pocket gold at the Latimer Gold Mine in Wilkes County that yielded 180 troy ounces of wire and cystalline gold from 2,500 pounds of pocket material. Several years ago interesting gold samples were found beside a spring in southeast Atlanta. The gold was in white quartz. Outstanding specimens of native gold in quartz came from the Norrell Mine in Lumpkin County. A single pocket, at the base of what was known locally as Reservoir Hill produced approximately 700 ounces. The gold mining, prospecting and panning sites continue on the adjoining Alabama, North Carolina and South Carolina Gold Prospecting and Panning Maps. To request gold prospecting and panning maps, please go to "REQUESTING GOLD MAPS", below. RECREATIONAL GOLD PROSPECTING, GOLD PANNING, TREASURE HUNTING AND ROCKHOUNDING ARE FUN!

Georgia Gold

Posted by wendell mosley on Comments comments (0)
WHERE TO LOOK FOR AND FIND GOLD IN GEORGIA Big Ten, Inc.'s Georgia Gold Prospecting and Panning Map shows places where to look to find gold near Acworth, Alpharetta, Atlanta, Auraria, Ball Ground, Blairsville, Blue Ridge, Bremen, Buchanan, Buford, Canton , Carrollton, Cartersville, Cedartown, Clarkesville, Clayton, Cleveland, Cornelia, Cumming, Dahlonega, Dallas, Dalton, Dawsonville, Decatur, Doraville, Douglasville, Duluth, Elberton, Ellijay, Gainesville, Hartwell, Helen, Hiawassee, Kennesaw, Lawrenceville, Lincolnton, Lithia Springs, Mableton, Marietta, McDonough , Monroe, Newnan, Powder Springs, Rockmart, Roswell, Royston, Smyrna, Social Circle, Stone Mountain, Tallapoosa, Tallulah Falls, Thomson, Toccoa, Tucker, Union Point, Villa Rica, Washington, Winder and Young Harris. It shows five hundred (500) gold mines and prospecting and panning locations from official geological records of the State of Georgia and the federal government. Locations for finding gold are shown within 15 miles of each of the above listed places. These gold deposit locations, which show where gold has been found in the past, are clearly marked. The map is done in color. The margin of the map has text that tells where to look for gold in a streambed, how to tell "fools gold" from real gold and gives step-by-step gold panning instructions. You can quickly learn to pan by following the instructions on the map.

Alabama Gold

Posted by wendell mosley on Comments comments (1)
WHERE TO LOOK FOR AND FIND GOLD IN ALABAMA Big Ten, Inc.'s Alabama Gold Prospecting and Panning Map shows places where to look to find gold near Alabaster, Alexander City, Anniston, Ashland, Auburn, Calera, Camp Hill, Carrville, Childersburg, Clanton, Columbiana, Cragford, Dadeville, Fort McClellan, Gold Hill, Goodwater, Heflin, Jordan Lake, Lake Mitchell, Lafayette, Lineville, Louina, Martin Lake, Mignon, Parkdale, Pell City, Prattville, Oxford, Red Hill, Roanoke, Rockford, Talladega, Talladega National Forest, Tallassee, Wadley, Wedowee, and Wetumpka. It shows one hundred forty (140) gold mines and prospecting and panning locations from official geological records of the State of Alabama and the federal government. Locations for finding gold are shown within 25 miles of each of the above listed places. These gold deposit locations, which show where gold has been found in the past, are clearly marked. The map is done in color. The margin of the map has text that tells where to look for gold in a streambed, how to tell "fools gold" from real gold and gives step-by-step gold panning instructions. You can quickly learn to pan by following the instructions on the map.

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